Honey Dew Melon

Winter melons

Optimizing Concentration and Timing of a Phage Spray Application to Reduce Listeria monocytogenes on Honeydew Melon Tissue

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Authors: 
Britta Leverentz
Authors: 
William S. Conway
Authors: 
Wojciech Janisiewicz
Authors: 
Mary J. Camp
Publisher: 
Journal of Food Protection
Year: 
2,004

Florida Plant Disease Management Guide: Chemical Control Guide for Diseases of Vegetables, Revision No. 21

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This publication is a guide to lawful use of sprayable chemicals intended for control of plant diseases affecting vegetables grown in Florida. For each crop, products are listed by FRAC code in alphabetical order to help differentiate products based on their active ingredient(s) and their specific mode of action(s).

Authors: 
Gary Vallad
Authors: 
Ken Pernezny
Authors: 
Natalia Peres
Authors: 
Richard Raid
Authors: 
Pam Roberts
Authors: 
Shouan Zhang
Publisher: 
University of Florida, IFAS
Year: 
2,010

Fruit and Tree Nuts Outlook, March 2012

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Fruit and Tree Nuts Outlook, which is presented in a newsletter format four times a year, provides current intelligence and forecasts the effects of changing conditions in the U.S. fruit and tree nuts sector. Topics include production, consumption, shipments, trade, prices received, and more.

Authors: 
Kristy Plattner
Authors: 
Agnes Perez
Publisher: 
Economic Research Service, USDA
Year: 
2,012

Vegetables 2011 Summary

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Authors: 
USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service
Publisher: 
USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service
Year: 
2,012

Vegetables and Melons Outlook - October 2011

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Authors: 
Gary Lucier
Authors: 
Lewrene Glaser
Authors: 
Suzanne Thornsbury
Publisher: 
USDA ERS
Year: 
2,011

Precooling Fruits and Vegetables in Georgia

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Fruits and vegetables begin to deteriorate after they are harvested and separated from their growing environment. The rate of deterioration defines how long they will be acceptable for consumption. This is known as “shelf life.” To preserve the quality of fruits and vegetables and maximize profits for growers, it is critical to control the temperature of fresh produce and minimize the amount of time that products are exposed to detrimental temperatures.

Authors: 
Changying “Charlie” Li
Publisher: 
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension
Year: 
2,011

Effect of Cooling Delays on Fruit and Vegetable Quality

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Authors: 
Jim Thompson
Authors: 
Marita Cantwell
Authors: 
Mary Lu Arpaia
Authors: 
Adel Kader
Authors: 
Carlos Crisosto
Authors: 
Joe Smilanick
Publisher: 
Perishables Handling Quarterly
Year: 
2,001

Powdery mildew of cucurbits in Florida

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Powdery mildew is a common and serious disease of cucurbit crops in Florida. This disease occurs in cucumbers, muskmelons, honeydew, squash, gourds, and pumpkins grown both in field and greenhouse conditions. Previously, powdery mildew was an occasional problem for watermelons, but for the past 5 years the incidence of powdery mildew outbreaks has increased (Roberts and Kucharek 2005). A powdery mildew infection acts as a sink for plant photosynthates causing reductions in plant growth, premature foliage loss, and consequently a reduction in yield.

Authors: 
Hector G. Nuñez-Palenius
Authors: 
Donald Hopkins
Authors: 
Daniel J. Cantliffe
Publisher: 
University of Florida IFAS Extension
Year: 
2,009

Reducing Salmonella on Cantaloupes and Honeydew Melons using Wash Practices Applicable to Postharvest Handling, Foodservice, and Consumer Preparation

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Washing conditions that included a soak or brush scrub were evaluated for removal of Salmonella from the surface of smooth (honeydew) or complex (cantaloupe) melon rinds. Melon rinds were spot-inoculated onto a 2.5 cm2 area of rind (squares) with approximately 6.0 log10 CFU/square of an avirulent nalidixic acid-resistant strain of Salmonella typhimurium. Melons were washed by immersion in 1500 ml of water or 200 ppm total chlorine and allowed to soak or were scrubbed over the entire melon surface with a sterile vegetable brush for 60 s.

Authors: 
Tracy L. Parnella
Authors: 
Linda J. Harrisa
Authors: 
Trevor V. Suslow
Publisher: 
International Journal of Food Microbiology
Year: 
2,005

Vegetables April 2011

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This full-text report, issued 5 times a year, provides data on fresh market vegetables, strawberries and melons, including area harvested, prospective area, yield, and production, by season and crop for major States.

Authors: 
National Agricultural Statistics Service
Publisher: 
USDA NASS
Year: 
2,011
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