Turnip

FJ Commerce LTD

Company "FJ Commerce ltd" offers a refined and crude sunflower and rapeseed oil produced in Russia from the refinery owned by our partners with whom we have contractual arrangements for distribution of their products. Delivery is CIF - to any seaport, and refined oils can be supplied in bottles of 1,2,3,5,10 (PET) liters with label brand of the client. All kinds of oil that we offer are available in bulk packaging convenient for the customer (flexitanks, cans, etc.). All oils that we offer can be produced by preset parameters and specifications.

Location

Bulgaria
Trapezisa 6
Pazardzhik 4400
Bulgaria
Phone: 00359888520030
Fax: +35934443775
Year: 
2,007
Contact: 
Greta Letcheva
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FJ Commerce LTD
Crude & Refined Sunflower And Rapeseed Oil
Greta Letcheva
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Vegetable Production Guide for Commercial Growers

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This publication is an extensive vegetable production guide that addresses topics such as marketing aspects for production decisions, general production considerations, insect management, weed management, and disease management. You will find specific information for the following crops:

Authors: 
Tim Coolong
Authors: 
Ric Bessin
Authors: 
Shawn Wright
Authors: 
John Strang
Authors: 
Kenny Seebold
Publisher: 
University of Kentucky
Year: 
2,013

Turnip Mosaic Virus

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Turnip Mosaic Virus (TuMV) infects most cruciferous plants, but is most damaging in Chinese cabbage, turnip, mustard, and radish. The most common symptom in these crops is a distinct mosaic of light and dark green colors in the leaves. Depending upon the virus strain and the crop species, necrotic streaks, flecks, or ringspots may also occur. Necrotic spots and ringspots are the primary symptom in common cabbage, but the severity of symptoms is cultivar dependent.

Authors: 
Lowell L Black
Publisher: 
AVRDC – The World Vegetable Center
Year: 
2,001

Resource Guide for Organic Insect and Disease Management

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The Guide is divided into three sections. The first section provides cultural information and management practices for a number of important vegetable crop groups. For each family, key pests and disease problems are described. Cultural methods and management practices that will help control each problem are listed, as well as materials that may be recommended for use.

Authors: 
Brian Caldwell
Authors: 
Eric Sideman
Authors: 
Abby Seaman
Authors: 
Anthony Shelton
Authors: 
Christine Smart
Publisher: 
Cornell University
Year: 
2,013

Midwest Vegetable Production Guide for Commercial Growers

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Contents:

Authors: 
Dan Egel
Authors: 
Ricky Foster
Authors: 
Elizabeth Maynard
Authors: 
Rick Weinzierl
Authors: 
Mohammad Babadoost
Authors: 
Patrick O’Malley
Authors: 
Ajay Nair
Authors: 
Raymond Cloyd
Authors: 
Cary Rivard
Authors: 
Megan Kennelly
Authors: 
Bill Hutchison
Authors: 
Sanjun Gu
Authors: 
Robert J. Precheur
Authors: 
Celeste Welty
Authors: 
Douglas Doohan
Authors: 
Sally Miller
Publisher: 
University of Illinois Extension, Purdue Extension, Iowa State University Extension, Kansas State University Research, University of Minnesota Extension, University of Missouri Extension, and Ohio State University Extension
Year: 
2,013

Postharvest handling and cooling of fresh fruits, vegetables, and flowers for small farms: Cooling

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Field heat should be removed from fresh fruits, vegetables, and flowers as quickly as possible after harvest. Each commodity should be maintained at its lowest safe temperature. Cooling and storage requirements for specific commodities are presented below, in NC Cooperative Extension Service Publication AG-414-1, and USDA Agricultural Handbook No. 66.
Proper postharvest cooling can:

Authors: 
L. G. Wilson
Authors: 
M. D. Boyette
Authors: 
E. A. Estes
Publisher: 
North Carolina Cooperative Extension Service
Year: 
1,999

Saving Your Own Vegetable Seeds - a guide for farmers

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Vegetable seeds can be saved to sow new crops in the future, but not all seeds are suitable for saving. Varieties suitable for seed saving include local varieties that have been grown in one region for a very long time, self-pollinating crops (for example, beans and peas), and open-pollinated varieties of some cross-pollinating crops (for example, pepper, cucumber and carrot).

Authors: 
Sutevee Sukprakarn
Authors: 
Sunanta Juntakool
Authors: 
Rukui Huang
Authors: 
Tom Kalb
Publisher: 
AVRDC – The World Vegetable Center
Year: 
2,005
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