A Guide to Intensive Vegetable Systems

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“Intensive Vegetable Production” refers to a system of marketing and producing vegetable crops in which great attention is placed on detail and optimization of resources such as land, capital, labor, equipment, transportation to market, and management time. The ojective of such system is maximum profit for the farm.The system you choose should take into account your location, availability of markets, production seasons, and personal interest. This system differs from most extensive crop production systems because land and other resources are used several times a year, rather than for a short, very active period. An important caution is to reduce the intensity of activity to measured level throughout the year so that you do not experience burnout.” We suggest that you first find a market for the crops you wish to grow. Then, select crops that can give you a spread of cash flow and labor demands throughout the year.

We suggest that you start with no more than six crops and that these crops mature in different seasons. With experience, you can increase the number of crops as the markets dictate. For example: lettuce in the early spring, snap beans in the late spring, cucumbers for early summer, peppers in early midsummer, tomatoes in midsummer, snap beans again in early fall, and greens or broccoli for late fall and early winter.

Intensive production systems can be very profitable, with a net profit of $5,000 per acre not uncommon. Good planning and attention to the production and marketing practices described in this bulletin can help you attain this level of profit.

Authors: 
D. C. Sanders
Authors: 
Ed Estes
Authors: 
K. B. Perry
Authors: 
David Monks
Authors: 
Kenneth Sorensen
Authors: 
Charles Averre
Authors: 
Michael Linker
Authors: 
Jonathan Schultheis
Authors: 
Mike Boyette
Authors: 
D. Eikhoff
Publisher: 
North Carolina Cooperative Extension Service
Year: 
1997