Pumpkins and Squash (Summer and Winter) 2010 Ohio Vegetable Production Guide

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Summer squash usually is direct seeded or planted by transplants for early markets. The use of black plastic and transplants also increases early yields in cool springs. Do not plant squash or pumpkin seed until soil temperature reaches 60°F.

Transplants should be grown in large (3-inch) cells or containers. The roots should not be disturbed at transplanting.
Summer squash tends to develop female flowers before male flowers, especially during cool weather. These fruits enlarge for a short time and then abort. This often is a concern of growers, but it remedies itself once growing conditions become favorable.

Pumpkins and squash require bee activity for good fruit set. Fruit set in winter squash and pumpkins takes place largely in a 2- to 3-week period. Poor pollination results in poorly shaped fruit as well as excessive blossom drop. One hive of bees is recommended per acre.

Authors: 
Robert J. Precheur
Authors: 
Mark Bennett
Authors: 
Brad Bergefurd
Authors: 
Luis Cañas
Authors: 
David Francis
Authors: 
Gary Gao
Authors: 
Casey Hoy
Authors: 
Jim Jasinski
Authors: 
Mark Koenig
Authors: 
Matt Kleinhenz
Authors: 
Hal Kneen
Publisher: 
Ohio State University Extension
Year: 
2010