Citrus

All species of the Genus Citrus

Morocco: Citrus Semi-Annual 2009

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The Moroccan citrus export season of 2008/09 has been disappointing. Total citrus exports are estimated at 469,150 tons, a decline of 15 percent compared to exports in 2007/08 and about 28 percent below the government’s target for this year. Most of the decline occurred in orange exports. Exports to Russia, the main export market, suffered a sharp decline.

Authors: 
Hassan F. Ahmed
Publisher: 
USDA GAIN
Year: 
2009

2010 Florida Citrus Pest Management Guide: Nematodes

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Integrated pest management (IPM) for nematodes requires: 1) determining whether pathogenic nematodes are present within the grove; 2) determining whether nematode population densities are high enough to cause economic loss; and 3) selecting a profitable management option. Attempting to manage nematodes may be unprofitable unless all of the above procedures are carefully followed. Similarly, some management methods pose risk to people and the environment. Therefore it is important to know that their use is justified by the actual conditions in a grove.

Authors: 
L.W. Duncan
Authors: 
J.W. Noling
Authors: 
R.N. Inserra
Publisher: 
University of Florida IFAS Extension
Year: 
2010

Citrus Production Forecast June 2010

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All Oranges Increased to 133.6 Million Boxes

Authors: 
USDA NASS
Publisher: 
USDA NASS
Year: 
2010

2010 Florida Citrus Pest Management Guide: Plant Bugs, Chewing Insect Pests, Caribbean Fruit Fly, and Thrips

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Authors: 
P.A. Stansly
Authors: 
C.C. Childers
Authors: 
H.N. Nigg
Authors: 
S.E. Simpson
Publisher: 
University of Florida, IFAS Extension
Year: 
2010

2010 Florida Citrus Pest Management Guide: Citrus Root Weevils

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Citrus root weevils represent a complex of species known to infest citrus trees and various alternate host plants in Florida. The most common species infesting citrus in order of greatest geographical distribution are the blue-green citrus root weevils, Pachnaeus litus and Pachnaeus opalus, the Diaprepes root weevil, Diaprepes abbreviatus, the little leaf notcher, Artipus floridanus, and the Fuller rose beetle, Asynonychus godmani. Other lesser species inhabit citrus on occasion.

Authors: 
L.W. Duncan
Authors: 
M.E. Rogers
Authors: 
C.W. McCoy
Authors: 
S.H. Futch
Authors: 
J.H. Graham
Authors: 
H.N. Nigg
Publisher: 
University of Florida, IFAS Extension
Year: 
2010

Fruit and Tree Nuts Outlook, May 28, 2010

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The index of prices received by fruit and tree nut growers fell 9 percent from the March index. Pushing down the index were significant grower price declines for grapefruit and strawberries in April from the previous month. These price declines more than offset price gains for other citrus crops and for fresh-market apples and pears during the month.

Authors: 
Agnes Perez
Authors: 
Erik Dohlman
Authors: 
Kristy Plattner
Publisher: 
USDA Economic Research Service
Year: 
2010

Turkey: Citrus Annual 2009

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Authors: 
Ralph Gifford
Authors: 
Yasemin Erkut
Publisher: 
USDA GAIN
Year: 
2010

2010 Florida Citrus Pest Management Guide: Soft-Bodied Insects Attacking Foliage and Fruit

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This section of the Citrus Pest Management Guide provides information on the group of insects belonging to the order Homoptera which affect foliage, twigs, and fruit of citrus in Florida. The insects covered here include scale insects, mealybugs, whiteflies, and aphids. These insect species affect tree health and fruit quality, and can impact mature fruiting trees as well as newly planted groves and resets. Their biologies, generation times, plant parts affected, and injury vary, but similar approaches to their monitoring and management cause them to be grouped here.

Authors: 
H.W. Browning
Authors: 
C.C. Childers
Authors: 
P.A. Stansly
Authors: 
J. Peña
Authors: 
M.E. Rogers
Publisher: 
University of Florida, IFAS Extension
Year: 
2010

2010 Florida Citrus Pest Management Guide: Rust Mites, Spider Mites, and Other Phytophagous Mites

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There are four families of phytophagous mites with species that are of economic importance:

  1. Eriophyidae: pink citrus rust mite (Aculops pelekassi) and the citrus rust mite (Phyllocoptruta oleivora);

  2. Tetranychidae: Texas citrus mite (Eutetranychus banksi), citrus red mite (Panonychus citri) and the six-spotted mite (Eotetranychus sexmaculatus);

  3. Tarsonemidae: broad mite (Polyphagotarsonemus latus);

Authors: 
M.E. Rogers
Authors: 
P.A. Stansly
Authors: 
C.C. Childers
Authors: 
C.W. McCoy
Authors: 
H.N. Nigg
Publisher: 
University of Florida, IFAS Extension
Year: 
2010

2010 Florida Citrus Pest Management Guide: Pesticide Resistance and Resistance Management

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Authors: 
M.E. Rogers
Authors: 
M.M. Dewdney
Publisher: 
University of Florida, IFAS Extension
Year: 
2010
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