Citrus

All species of the Genus Citrus

Influence of pH and NaHCO3 on Effectiveness of Imazalil to Inhibit Germination of Penicillium digitatum and to Control Postharvest Green Mold on Citrus Fruit

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Authors: 
J.L. Smilanick
Authors: 
M.F. Mansour
Authors: 
D.A. Margosan
Authors: 
F. Mlikota Gabler
Publisher: 
Plant Disease
Year: 
2005

Estudio de Mercado sobre Conservas de Frutas en India

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Authors: 
Oficina Comercial de ProChile en Nueva Delhi, India
Publisher: 
ProChile
Year: 
2011

Pre- and Postharvest Treatments to Control Green Mold of Citrus Fruit During Ethylene Degreening

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Authors: 
J.L. Smilanick
Authors: 
M.F. Mansour
Authors: 
D. Sorenson
Publisher: 
Plant Disease
Year: 
2006

Estudio de Mercado Cítricos (Limones y Mandarinas) en R.P.China

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Limones

Authors: 
Oficina Comercial de ProChile en Beijing
Publisher: 
ProChile
Year: 
2011

Fertilizer Management for Citrus Orchards

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The Law of the Minimum Nutrient" means that in citrus trees, as in other crops, the growth of the plant is limited by the nutrient element present in the smallest quantity, even if all other nutrients are present in adequate amounts. It is of the utmost importance in citrus production to know which, if any, nutrient element is the limiting factor. If there is a deficiency of any nutrient, then the fertilizer program must remedy this.

Authors: 
Food & Fertilizer Technology Center
Publisher: 
Food & Fertilizer Technology Center
Year: 
2003

Fruit and Tree Nuts Outlook, March 2012

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Fruit and Tree Nuts Outlook, which is presented in a newsletter format four times a year, provides current intelligence and forecasts the effects of changing conditions in the U.S. fruit and tree nuts sector. Topics include production, consumption, shipments, trade, prices received, and more.

Authors: 
Kristy Plattner
Authors: 
Agnes Perez
Publisher: 
Economic Research Service, USDA
Year: 
2012

Water Management for Citrus Orchards

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Water is the basic component of plant cell tissue. It is water, above all, which controls the growth and development of citrus trees. Most of the water absorbed by the plant comes from the soil. Nutrients present in the soil are dissolved in water, taken up by the tree, and supplied to all parts of plant through translocation.

Authors: 
Food & Fertilizer Technology Center
Publisher: 
Food & Fertilizer Technology Center
Year: 
2003

Recomendaciones para el manejo de las moscas de las frutas en cítricos, guayaba, mango, melón y papaya

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Contenido:

Authors: 
Alvaro Urbina Bengoechea
Authors: 
Manuel Pinto Z.
Publisher: 
Corpoica

Soil Management for Citrus Orchards

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Soil plays the role of a growing medium for perennial, deep-rooted citrus trees. It provides not only mechanical support for the tree, but also air, water and all the required nutrients for the roots. Soil properties control the availability of soil nutrients and the nutrient uptake by roots. They have a major influence on the growth of citrus trees and the quality of their fruit.

Authors: 
Food & Fertilizer Technology Center
Publisher: 
Food & Fertilizer Technology Center
Year: 
2003

The Effectiveness of Pyrimethanil to Inhibit Germination of Penicillium digitatum and to Control Citrus Green Mold after Harvest

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Authors: 
J.L. Smilanick
Authors: 
M.F. Mansour
Authors: 
F. Mlikota Gabler
Authors: 
W.R. Goodwine
Publisher: 
Postharvest Biology and Technology
Year: 
2006
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