Citrus

All species of the Genus Citrus

Control of citrus postharvest green mold and sour rot by potassium sorbate combined with heat and fungicides

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Authors: 
Joseph L. Smilanick
Authors: 
Monir F. Mansour
Authors: 
Franka Mlikota Gabler
Authors: 
David Sorenson
Publisher: 
Postharvest Biology and Technology
Year: 
2008

Citrus Production: Citrus Nursery Trees Grown in Containers

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Most commercial citrus nurseries use grafting to propagate nursery trees. However, there are more than 30 kinds of citrus pathogens which can be transmitted by grafting, via infected budwood. These include citrus greening, tristeza, exocortis, tatter leaf, xyloporosis and psorosis. Once a plant is infected, such diseases may have a serious influence on growth. They shorten the life-span of the orchard and reduce yields and fruit quality.

Authors: 
Food & Fertilizer Technology Center
Publisher: 
Food & Fertilizer Technology Center
Year: 
2003

Alternatives to Conventional Fungicides for the Control of Citrus Postharvest Green and Blue Moulds

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Purpose of review: This article reviews research based on the evaluation of postharvest control methods alternative to conventional chemical fungicides for the control of citrus green and blue moulds, caused by the pathogens Penicillium digitatum and P. italicum, respectively. Emphasis is given to advances developed during the last few years. Potential benefits, disadvantages and commercial feasibility of the application of these methods are discussed.

Authors: 
Lluís Palou
Authors: 
Joseph L. Smilanick
Authors: 
Samir Droby
Publisher: 
Stewart Postharvest Review

Citrus Production: Planting the Citrus Orchard

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Tree spacing is affected by factors such as the species of citrus concerned, the cultivar, the type of rootstock, the environment, the size of the orchard, and the manage-ment practices which the grower will be using. For example, if he will be using machinery, he must leave enough space between the rows for the machines to pass when the trees are mature.
 

Authors: 
Food & Fertilizer Technology Center
Publisher: 
Food & Fertilizer Technology Center
Year: 
2003

Citrus Production: Design of the Citrus Orchard

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Authors: 
Food & Fertilizer Technology Center
Publisher: 
Food & Fertilizer Technology Center, Taiwan
Year: 
2003

Efficacy and Application Strategies for Propiconazole as a New Postharvest Fungicide for Managing Sour Rot and Green Mold of Citrus Fruit

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Authors: 
A. H. McKay
Authors: 
H. Förster
Authors: 
J. E. Adaskaveg
Publisher: 
Plant Disease
Year: 
2012

Targeted insecticides to control Australian citrus whitefly (Orchamoplatus citri)

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Authors: 
L.E. Jamieson
Authors: 
N.E.M Page-Weir
Authors: 
K. Pyle
Publisher: 
New Zealand Plant Protection
Year: 
2011

Integrated Approaches to Postharvest Disease Management in California Citrus Packinghouses

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Authors: 
J.L. Smilanick
Publisher: 
Acta Hort
Year: 
2011

Fruit and Tree Nuts Outlook - September 2011

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Authors: 
Agnes Perez
Authors: 
Kristy Plattner
Authors: 
Katherine Baldwin
Publisher: 
USDA ERS
Year: 
2011

Citrus Fruits 2011 Summary

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Citrus utilized production for the 2010-2011 season totaled 11.7 million tons, up 7 percent from the 2009-2010 season. Florida accounted for 63 percent of total United States citrus production, California totaled 33 percent, and Texas and Arizona produced the remaining 4 percent. Utilized citrus production was up from the previous year in all citrus reporting States.

Authors: 
USDA NASS
Publisher: 
USDA NASS
Year: 
2011
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