Citrus

All species of the Genus Citrus

Postharvest Handling of Citrus

0
No votes yet
Your rating: None


In tropical and subtropical countries, the development of the fruit is affected by the temperature. Maturity of the rind and maturity of the flesh of the fruit are not synchronized. The fruit is edible even when the rind still remains green.
Mature fruit vary in size, even those on the same tree. With sweet oranges such as Valencia or Liucheng, harvesting should begin with the smaller fruit which mature first.

Authors: 
Food & Fertilizer Technology Center, Taiwan
Publisher: 
Food & Fertilizer Technology Center, Taiwan
Year: 
2003

2010 Florida Citrus Pest Management Guide: Alternaria Brown Spot

0
No votes yet
Your rating: None

university_of_florida.gifAlternaria brown spot, caused by the fungus Alternaria alternata, affects Minneola tangelos, Dancy tangerines, Murcotts, and less frequently Orlando tangelos, Novas, Lees, and Sunburst. In rare cases, it may also infect grapefruit. Where severe, the disease results in extensive fruit drop and must be controlled on processing and fresh market fruit.

Authors: 
M.M. Dewdney
Authors: 
L.W. Timmer
Publisher: 
University of Florida IFAS Extension
Year: 
2010

2010 Florida Citrus Pest Management Guide: Citrus Scab

0
No votes yet
Your rating: None

university_of_florida.gif

Citrus scab caused by the fungus Elsinoe fawcettii affects grapefruit, Temples, Murcotts, tangelos, and some other tangerine hybrids. There is no need to control citrus scab on processing fruit, except possibly on Temples, where severe early infection reduces fruit size. Reduction or elimination of overhead irrigation on susceptible varieties during the active growth period of the fruit will decrease disease severity.

Authors: 
M.M. Dewdney
Authors: 
L.W. Timmer
Publisher: 
University of Florida, IFAS Extension
Year: 
2010

Spain EU27 Citrus Annual 2009

0
No votes yet
Your rating: None

USDAGAIN.jpg

EU-27 citrus orchards include orange, lemon, mandarin and grapefruit groves. Production is mainly located in the Mediterranean regions of Spain, Italy and Greece, with lesser production in France, Cyprus, Malta and Portugal. For MY 2009/10, citrus production is expected to remain relatively flat compared to previous seasons. The overall decline in Spanish citrus production was offset by production increases in Italy, Greece and Portugal.

Authors: 
Marta Guerrero
Publisher: 
USDA GAIN
Year: 
2009

Japan Citrus Annual 2009

0
No votes yet
Your rating: None

USDAGAIN.jpg

Budget-conscious consumers and a stronger Japanese yen signal opportunities for U.S. citrus exports

Authors: 
Ito Kenzo
Authors: 
Jennifer Clever
Publisher: 
USDA GAIN
Year: 
2009

Fruit and Tree Nuts Outlook, July 2010

0
No votes yet
Your rating: None

The index of prices received by fruit and tree nut growers in June remained above that of a year ago, as was also true in each month from January through May 2010. The index this June was reported at 148 (1990-92=100), 15 percent higher than the June 2009 index. Strength in the June index stemmed from grower price gains realized mostly for freshmarket lemons, oranges, apples, pears, and strawberries. Prices for processing oranges also averaged higher.

Authors: 
Agnes Perez
Authors: 
Erik Dohlman
Authors: 
Kristy Plattner
Publisher: 
USDA Economic Research Service
Year: 
2010

Brazil Citrus Annual 2009

0
No votes yet
Your rating: None

USDAGAIN.jpg

Authors: 
Sergio Barros
Publisher: 
USDA GAIN
Year: 
2009

Citrus Production in Japan: New Trends in Technology

0
No votes yet
Your rating: None

FFTC.jpg

Authors: 
Isao Iwagaki
Publisher: 
Food & Fertilizer Technology Center, Taiwan
Year: 
1997

China Citrus Annual 2009

0
No votes yet
Your rating: None

USDAGAIN.jpg

Authors: 
Joshua Emmanuel Lagos
Authors: 
Wang Tong
Authors: 
Wu Bugang
Publisher: 
USDA GAIN
Year: 
2009

Mexico Citrus Annual 2009

0
No votes yet
Your rating: None

USDAGAIN.jpg

MY 2009/10 (November-October) production of fresh oranges is forecast at lower levels compared to the already low levels of MY 2008/09 as production areas, mainly the northern states of Mexico, were affected by dry weather conditions throughout 2009. Mexican orange exports are forecast to increase slightly from export levels of MY 2008/09 as more demand is expected from the international market. The final export figures will depend on U.S. demand.

Authors: 
Dulce Flores
Authors: 
Mark Ford
Publisher: 
USDA GAIN
Syndicate content