Pecan

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Impactos Potenciales del Cambio Climático en la Producción de Nuez en la Región del Noroeste de México y Suroeste de Estados Unidos

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Authors: 
J.G. Mexal
Authors: 
E. Herrera
Publisher: 
Technociencia Chihuahua
Year: 
2,013

2017 Commercial Pecan Spray Guide

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Contents: 

  1. Commercial Pecan Insect Control (Bearing Trees)
  2. Commercial Pecan INsect and Disease Spray Guide (Non-Bearing Trees)
  3. Pecan Chemicals: Pre-Harvest Intervals and Other Restrictions
  4. Pecan Disease Control 
  5. Commercial Pecan Weed Control  
  6. Foliar Zinc Sprays for Bearing Pecan Trees
  7. Foliar Nicel Sprays for Bearing and Non-Bearing Pecan Trees
  8. Foliar Boron Applicaiton for Bearing Pecan Trees
Authors: 
Tim Brenneman
Authors: 
Jason Brock
Authors: 
A. Stanley Culpepper
Authors: 
Will Hudson
Authors: 
Wayne Mitchem
Authors: 
Lenny Wells
Publisher: 
UGA Extension
Year: 
2,017

Training and Pruning Fruit Trees in North Carolina

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Contents: 

  1. Pruning vs. Training
  2. Dormant Pruning vs. Summer Pruning
  3. Types of Pruning Cuts
  4. Training Systems 
Authors: 
Michael L. Parker
Publisher: 
North Carolina Cooperative Extension Service
Year: 
2,017

Freezing Fruits

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You can freeze most fruits, but the quality of the frozen product depends on the kind of fruit, stage of maturity, and type of pack.

Authors: 
Mississippi State University Extension
Publisher: 
Mississippi State University Extension
Year: 
2,016

North Carolina Production Guide for Smaller Orchard Plantings

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Average: 4.7 (3 votes)
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Contents:

  • Introduction
  • Site SelectionSoils
  • Cultivar Selection
  • Rootstocks
  • Orchard Design
  • When and How to Plant
  • Planting a Fruit Tree
  • Pest, Disease, and Weed Control
  • Pruning and Training for Tree Development
  • Harvesting
  • Post-Harvest Handling
  • Potential Markets
  • Resources
Authors: 
Nicholas T. Basinger
Authors: 
Joseph M. Owle
Authors: 
Abbey Piner
Authors: 
Michael L. Parker
Publisher: 
North Carolina Cooperative Extension Service
Year: 
2,016

Climate Change Impacts on Winter Chill for Temperate Fruit and Nut Production: A Review

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Temperate fruit and nut species require exposure to chilling conditions in winter to break dormancy and produce high yields. Adequate winter chill is an important site characteristic for commercial orchard operations, and quantifying chill is crucial for orchard management. Climate change may impact winter chill. With a view to adapting orchards to climate change, this review assesses the state of knowledge in modelling winter chill and the performance of various modelling approaches.

Authors: 
Eike Luedeling
Publisher: 
Scientia Horticulturae
Year: 
2,012

Guía para la plantación y cuidado de árboles jóvenes de Pecán

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La guía de plantación y cuidados se ha diseñado para productores emprendedores de pecán que se inician.
Contenidos:

Authors: 
Ernesto Rafael Madero
Authors: 
Florencia Trabichet
Publisher: 
INTA Argentina
Year: 
2,013

Orchard-Floor Management in Pecans

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The objective of this leaflet is to briefly discuss orchard floor management options in pecan orchards along with herbicide considerations, and potential herbicides. It should be used as a guide for producers making orchard floor management decisions.

Authors: 
W. E. Mitchem
Authors: 
M. L. Parker
Publisher: 
North Carolina State University
Year: 
2,005

Growing Pecans in North Carolina

4.5
Average: 4.5 (2 votes)
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Authors: 
Micael L. Parker
Authors: 
Kenneth A. Sorensen
Publisher: 
North Carolina Cooperative Extension Service

Training and Pruning Fruit Trees

3.8
Average: 3.8 (5 votes)
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A primary objective of training and pruning is to develop a strong tree framework that will support fruit production. Improperly trained fruit trees generally have very upright branch angles, which result in serious limb breakage under a heavy fruit load. This significantly reduces the tree’s productivity and may greatly reduce its life. Another goal of annual training and pruning is to remove dead, diseased, or broken limbs.

Authors: 
Michael L. Parker
Publisher: 
North Carolina Cooperative Extension Service
Year: 
2,008
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