Watermelon

Midwest Vegetable Production Guide for Commercial Growers

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Contents:

Authors: 
Dan Egel
Authors: 
Ricky Foster
Authors: 
Elizabeth Maynard
Authors: 
Rick Weinzierl
Authors: 
Mohammad Babadoost
Authors: 
Patrick O’Malley
Authors: 
Ajay Nair
Authors: 
Raymond Cloyd
Authors: 
Cary Rivard
Authors: 
Megan Kennelly
Authors: 
Bill Hutchison
Authors: 
Sanjun Gu
Authors: 
Robert J. Precheur
Authors: 
Celeste Welty
Authors: 
Douglas Doohan
Authors: 
Sally Miller
Publisher: 
University of Illinois Extension, Purdue Extension, Iowa State University Extension, Kansas State University Research, University of Minnesota Extension, University of Missouri Extension, and Ohio State University Extension
Year: 
2013

Commercial Watermelon Production

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Watermelon is a warm-season crop related to cantaloupe, squash, cucumber and pumpkin. Watermelons can be grown on any well-drained soil throughout Georgia but are particularly well adapted to the Coastal Plain soils of South Georgia. Watermelons will continue to be an important part of vegetable production in the state. Increases in average yield per acre will continue as more growers adopt plastic mulch, intensive management and new hybrid varieties.
Contents:

Authors: 
George E. Boyhan
Authors: 
Darbie M. Granberry
Authors: 
W. Terry Kelley
Authors: 
J. Danny Gay
Authors: 
David Adams
Authors: 
Paul E. Sumner
Authors: 
Anthony W. Tyson
Authors: 
Kerry Harrison
Authors: 
Greg MacDonald
Authors: 
William C. Hurst
Authors: 
George O. Westberry
Authors: 
William O. Mizelle
Publisher: 
University of Georgia
Year: 
2013

Effects of season and fruit size on the quality of ‘egusi’ melon [Citrullus lanatus (Thunb) Matsum and Nakai] seed

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Authors: 
P. A. Kortse
Authors: 
J. A. Oladiran
Authors: 
T. S. Msaakpa
Publisher: 
ARPN Journal of Agricultural and Biological Science
Year: 
2012

A Manual on Vegetable Seed Production in Bangladesh

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Authors: 
M. A. Rashid
Authors: 
D. P. Singh
Publisher: 
AVRDC-USAID-Bangladesh Project
Year: 
2000

Postharvest handling and cooling of fresh fruits, vegetables, and flowers for small farms: Cooling

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Field heat should be removed from fresh fruits, vegetables, and flowers as quickly as possible after harvest. Each commodity should be maintained at its lowest safe temperature. Cooling and storage requirements for specific commodities are presented below, in NC Cooperative Extension Service Publication AG-414-1, and USDA Agricultural Handbook No. 66.
Proper postharvest cooling can:

Authors: 
L. G. Wilson
Authors: 
M. D. Boyette
Authors: 
E. A. Estes
Publisher: 
North Carolina Cooperative Extension Service
Year: 
1999

Postharvest handling and cooling of fresh fruits, vegetables, and flowers for small farms: Mixed Loads

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At times, it is necessary to transport or store different commodities together. In such mixed loads it is very important to combine only those commodities that are compatible with respect to their requirements for:

Authors: 
L. G. Wilson
Authors: 
M. D. Boyette
Authors: 
E. A. Estes
Publisher: 
North Carolina Cooperative Extension Service
Year: 
1999

Fertility and Fertigation Management for High Tunnel Production

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Authors: 
Carl Rosen
Authors: 
Jerry Wright
Authors: 
Terry Nennich
Authors: 
Dave Wildung
Publisher: 
University of Minnesota
Year: 
2004

Cucurbit downy mildew photos

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  • Downy Mildew on Cucumber
  • Downy mildew symptoms on cucumber
  • Downy Mildew Symptoms on Other Crops
Authors: 
Mary K. Hausbeck
Publisher: 
Michigan State University

Florida Plant Disease Management Guide: Chemical Control Guide for Diseases of Vegetables, Revision No. 21

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This publication is a guide to lawful use of sprayable chemicals intended for control of plant diseases affecting vegetables grown in Florida. For each crop, products are listed by FRAC code in alphabetical order to help differentiate products based on their active ingredient(s) and their specific mode of action(s).

Authors: 
Gary Vallad
Authors: 
Ken Pernezny
Authors: 
Natalia Peres
Authors: 
Richard Raid
Authors: 
Pam Roberts
Authors: 
Shouan Zhang
Publisher: 
University of Florida, IFAS
Year: 
2010
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