Tools

Capital $ Investment in Postharvest Technology & Recovery of Invested Capital

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Authors: 
James R. Gorny
Authors: 
Lisa Kitinoja
Publisher: 
Perishables Handling Quarterly
Year: 
1999

The Influence of Eating Habit on Preferences towards Innovative Food Products

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Authors: 
K. Sparke
Authors: 
K. Menrad
Publisher: 
IUFoST
Year: 
2006

A Business of Details: Exporting High Value U.S. Agricultural Products

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Every year foreign businesses purchase billions of dollars worth of U.S. agricultural products. Exporting any product involves many people, numerous transactions, and critical paper work. Attending to the details can make or break an export venture.

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Authors: 
M. Elizabeth Gray
Authors: 
Ellen M. Welby
Publisher: 
USDA
Year: 
2000

Model Business Plan for Season Extension with Hoophouses

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Farmers can use this information to develop a business plan for hoophouse production. Such a plan may be required by lenders to obtain credit to purchase a hoophouse structure. Even if a loan is not required, it is a good practice to develop a business plan in advance of any major change or new venture in a farming operation. The plan can help a farmer anticipate and better deal with inevitable challenges.

Authors: 
David S. Conner
Publisher: 
Michigan State University Extension
Year: 
2010

Worksheet: Cash Flow Projection for Operating Loan Determination

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A cash flow statement can be described simply as a recording of the dollars coming in and the dollars going out of a business. It shows where the money comes from (the inflow of cash) and where the money goes (the outflow of cash).

Authors: 
Michael R. Langemeier
Publisher: 
Kansas State University Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service
Year: 
2005

Variable Costs and Enterprise Budgets

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This AgroBrief deals with variable costs and enterprise budgets. This is a small, basic subject of farm accounting that can be used as a means for both planning and evaluating performance of activities on a farm. After describing the basics of farm economics (1) and enterprises (2) methods of calculating a crop budget (3) and a livestock budget (4) are given. The document is concluded with a short discussion on the use of enterprise budgets.

Authors: 
Rob Witte
Publisher: 
Agromisa
Year: 
2006

Financial Fitness: Exercises to Shape Up Your Spending

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How is your financial health? If budget bumps and bulges or money worries are adding stress to your life, you may need to do an annual checkup to assess your financial fitness and start getting your family’s finances in good shape.

Authors: 
Bobbie D. Shaffett
Publisher: 
Mississippi State University
Year: 
2009

Ejercicios Financieros: Ejercicios para estar en forma con sus gastos

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¿Cómo se encuentra su salud financiera? Si el presupuesto lo sacude y le lleva ventaja, o las preocupaciones por el dinero aumentan el estrés en su vida, un chequeo anual para evaluar su situación financiera y comenzar a poner sus finanzas familiares en orden puede ser un buen comienzo.

Authors: 
Bobbie Shaffett
Publisher: 
Mississippi State University
Year: 
2007

Model Contracts for Small Firms

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Legal guidance for doing International Business

Authors: 
Jean-Paul Vulliéty
Authors: 
Ian Hewitt
Authors: 
David Marchese
Authors: 
Thierry d’Ornano
Authors: 
Jelena Perovic
Authors: 
Alexandra Venediger
Publisher: 
International Trade Centre
Year: 
2010

Interpretation and Use of the Amortization Table

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When money is borrowed to make long-term capital investments, it is generally paid back in a series of annual or semiannual payments. If these payments are to be the same amount each time, the loan is amortized. The even payment plan method of amortizing a loan allows for the payment of interest on the unpaid balance, plus some principal. The amount of the interest paid each period will decrease while the amount of the annual payment applied toward the principal will increase. The example in Table 1 illustrates how the amount of interest and principal changes over the loan period.

Authors: 
Michael R. Langemeier
Publisher: 
Kansas State University Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service
Year: 
2009
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