Plant Disease

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All related to plant pathology control and management

Effect of the Treatments in Controlling Purple Blotch Complex of Onion (Allium cepa L.)

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Authors: 
Umme Sarifun Akter
Authors: 
Harun Or Rashid
Authors: 
Aminur Rahman
Authors: 
Rafiqul Islam
Authors: 
Maksudul Haque
Publisher: 
Academic Journal of Plant Sciences
Year: 
2,015

Performance of ‘Valencia’ Orange (Citrus sinensis [L.] Osbeck) on 17 Rootstocks in a Trial Severely Affected by Huanglongbing

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‘Valencia’ orange (Citrus sinensis [L.] Osbeck) was grown on 17 rootstocks through seven years of age and the first four harvest seasons in a central Florida field trial severely affected by huanglongbing (HLB) disease. All trees in the trial had HLB symptoms and were shown by PCR to be infected with Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (Las). Large differences were noted between rootstocks for many metrics examined, including yield, fruit quality, and tree size.

Authors: 
Kim D. Bowman
Authors: 
Greg McCollum
Authors: 
Ute Albrecht
Publisher: 
Scientia Horticulturae
Year: 
2,016

Controlling Black Knot in Michigan

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Black knot (Apiosporina morbosa), is a striking disease and a major disease of plum trees in Michigan. Black knot appears on the woody parts of the tree including twigs, limbs and sometimes the trunks. Black knot attacks plums, wild cherries and some ornamental cherries. Cultivated sweet and sour cherry trees are seldom attacked in Michigan. Black knot is found throughout Michigan in commercial and home orchards and in wild plum and cherry thickets.

Disease pictures and control methods are discussed.

Authors: 
Mark Longstroth
Publisher: 
Michigan State University Extension
Year: 
2,016

Bacterial Leaf Scorch of Blueberry

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Relative to total sales, blueberries are the number one fruit commodity in the state of Georgia, surpassing even peaches. Recently, a new disease has been identified in the Georgia blueberry production region. This disease has been named “bacterial leaf scorch,” and it is caused by the bacterium Xylella fastidiosa.

Authors: 
Phillip M. Brannen
Authors: 
Gerard Krewer
Authors: 
Bob Boland
Authors: 
Dan Horton
Authors: 
CJ Chang
Publisher: 
University of Georgia Extension
Year: 
2,016

Estado fitosanitario del azafrán en Aragón (España): insectos, ácaros, nematodos, virus, bacterias y malas hierbas

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Authors: 
A. Cirujeda
Authors: 
Mª M. Coca-Abia
Authors: 
F. Escriu
Authors: 
A. Palacio-Bielsa
Authors: 
A.I. Marí
Authors: 
P. Zuriaga
Authors: 
J. Aibar
Authors: 
M. Luis-Arteaga
Authors: 
C. Zaragoza
Publisher: 
ITEA
Year: 
2,016

Actividad antifúngica e identificación molecular de cepas nativas de Bacillus subtilis

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Authors: 
Esaú Ruiz-Sánchez
Authors: 
Miguel Ángel. Mejía-Bautista
Authors: 
Alejandra Serrato-Díaz
Authors: 
Arturo Reyes-Ramírez
Authors: 
Yokiushirdhilgilmara Estrada-Girón
Authors: 
Alberto J. Valencia-Botín
Publisher: 
Agrociencia
Year: 
2,016

Grafting as a Tool to Improve Tomato yellow leaf curl disease (TYLCV)-Tolerance in Tomato

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Authors: 
Ahmed M.A. Mahmoud
Publisher: 
Journal of Horticultural Science & Ornamental Plants
Year: 
2,014

Disease Management Considerations for Producing Strawberry Plug Plants

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Authors: 
Frank Louws
Publisher: 
NC State University
Year: 
2,013

Black Root Rot of Strawberry

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Authors: 
Frank Louws
Publisher: 
NC State University
Year: 
2,014

Basil Downy Mildew

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Symptoms of the disease can be mistaken by nutritional problems since they manifest as a yellowing or browning of leaves. However, if the abaxial side of the leaf is inspected, profuse, dark sporulation will be covering the surface of infected leaves. Usually, the sporulation is obvious enough that it can be seen without a microscope or hand lens, however, when you take a closer look at the sporulation on the leaf with a hand lens or dissecting microscope, you will be able to see the typical sporangiophore structures bearing sporangia found in downy mildew pathogens

Authors: 
Lina Quesada-Ocampo
Publisher: 
North Carolina State University
Year: 
2,015
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