Chemical Weed Control

Calibrating Hand-Held Granular Spreaders for Nursery Weed Control

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Even the best herbicides will not provide effective weed control if they are not applied accurately and uniformly. Too little product results in poor weed control and higher hand-weeding costs. Too much can injure crops, reducing the number available for sale. Most granular herbicide labels contain some recommended settings for common application equipment. However, these recommendations are just starting points. To obtain the correct dose, you need to calibrate the spreader. Spreader calibration is essentially a very simple process:

Authors: 
Amy Barker
Authors: 
Joe Neal
Publisher: 
North Carolina Cooperative Extension Service
Year: 
2017

Acclaim Extra (fenoxaprop-p)

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Contents: 

  1. Uses
  2. Major Weeds Controlled
  3. Major Weeds Not Controlled
  4. For Best Results
  5. Cautions and Precautions
  6. Residual Activity 
  7. Volatility and Leaching Potential
  8. Symptoms and Mode of Action
  9. Additional Information

 

 

Authors: 
Joe Neal
Publisher: 
North Carolina Cooperative Extension Service
Year: 
2017

Weeds of Container Nurseries

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Weed control can be one of the most costly risks in the production of container-grown nursery crops. Any control program begins with correct identificaiton of the weeds present, along with an understanding of their life cycles and modes of reproduction and spread. Below are the most common weeds of outdoor container nurseries and some recently introduced species with the potential to spread. The Species in this bulletin are organized by type, family, and species. 

Authors: 
Joseph C. Neal
Authors: 
Jeffrey F. Derr
Publisher: 
North Carolina Association of Nurserymen
Year: 
2005

Weeds

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Authors: 
Kathleen Moore
Authors: 
Joe Neal
Authors: 
Lucy Bradley
Publisher: 
North Carolina Cooperative Extension Service
Year: 
2015

Chemical Application Equipment

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The objective of a chemical application program can be summed up with a single sentence: Put the right product on the right target at the right time. To accomplish this objective, good management practices and proper equipment are necessary. In selecting agricultural chemical application equipment, follow these guiding principles:
 
1. Considering acreage, crops, and labor, select the equipment that will best fit your farming operation.
Authors: 
G. T. Roberson
Publisher: 
North Carolina Cooperative Extension Service
Year: 
2016

Snapshot TG (isoxaben + trifluralin)

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Contents: 

  • Introduction
  • Uses
  • Major Weeds Controlled
  • Major Weeds Not Controlled
  • For Best Results 
  • Cautions and Precautions
  • Residual Activity
  • Volatility and Leaching Potential
  • Symptoms and Mode of Action
  • Additional Information 
Authors: 
Joe Neal
Publisher: 
North Carolina Cooperative Extension Service
Year: 
2016

Chemical Weed Control

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Contents

1.Chemical Weed Control in Field Corn, Cotton, Peanuts, Sorghum, Soybeans, Sunflowers, Tobacco, Wheat, Barley, Oats, Rye, Triticale, Clary Sage, Small Fruit Crops, Tree Fruit Crops, Hay Crops and Pastures, Lawns, Ornamentals, Forest Stands, Specific Weeds, and Woody Plants 

2.Glyphosate Formulations

3.Herbicide Resistance Management

4.Herbicide Modes of Action for Hay Crops, Pastures, Lawns and Turf

5.Forest Site Preparation, Stand Conversion, Timber Stand Improvement

Authors: 
W. J. Everman
Publisher: 
North Carolina Cooperative Extension Service
Year: 
2016

Preplant and Postemergence Control of Glyphosate-Resistant Giant Ragweed in Corn

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Authors: 
Kimberly D. Belfry
Authors: 
Peter H. Sikkema
Publisher: 
Scientific Research Publishing
Year: 
2015

UGA Weed Control Programs for Broccoli, Cabbage, and Cauliflower 2016

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When it comes to growing commercial broccoli, cabbage, and cauliflower, crop rotation, tillage, and a sound herbicide program are all often critical components for long-term success. This circular focuses on developing sound herbicide programs for cole crops while minimizing crop injury for the following production systems: 1) transplanting into mulch, 2) transplanting into bare ground, and 3) seeding into bare ground.

Authors: 
S. Culpepper
Authors: 
J. C. Smith
Publisher: 
University of Georgia, Department of Crop and Soil Sciences
Year: 
2016

Midwest Tree Fruit Spray Guide

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Authors: 
University of Arkansas
Authors: 
University of Illinois Extension
Authors: 
Purdue Extension
Authors: 
Iowa State University Extension and Outreach
Authors: 
Kansas State University Agricultural Experiment
Authors: 
University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service
Authors: 
University of Missouri and Missouri State University
Authors: 
Ohio State University Extension
Authors: 
University of Wisconsin Cooperative Extension Service
Publisher: 
Midwest Fruit Workers Group
Year: 
2016
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