Fruit & Vegetable Production

all related to crop production

Microclima en Invernaderos: sus efectos sobre intercambio de gases en cultivos, casos de Venezuela

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Authors: 
Ramón E. Jaimez
Authors: 
Pedro J. Martinez
Authors: 
Ronald Da Silva
Publisher: 
SABER ULA
Year: 
2007

Fertilizer Cost Calculations

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If the cost per pound of elemental P or K is desired, then the guarantee must be changed from P2O5 to P and/or K2O to K. To find the conversion factor, use the ratio of the molecular weight of (2 x P) and divide by the molecular weight of P2O5. A similar approach is used for K. No conversion is needed for N since it is already expressed on an elemental basis.

Authors: 
K.A. Barbarick
Authors: 
D.G. Westfall
Publisher: 
Colorado State University Extension
Year: 
2007

Diagnosing Saline and Sodic Soil Problems

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Symptoms and causes of salinity, high pH, specific ion toxicity, and sodicity are frequently confused. Each of these conditions can have adverse affects on plant growth, but they differ significantly in their cause and relative impact. Effective management of these problems vary and require proper diagnosis. Proper diagnosis is critical to successful problem correction.

Authors: 
R.M. Waskom
Authors: 
T.A. Bauder
Authors: 
J.G. Davis
Authors: 
G.E. Cardon
Publisher: 
Colorado State University Extension
Year: 
2007

Best Management Practices For Phosphorus Fertilization

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Authors: 
Reagan M. Waskom
Authors: 
Troy Bauder
Publisher: 
Colorado State University Extension
Year: 
1994

Coryneum Blight

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Coryneum blight — also called shot hole disease, California blight, peach blight or pustular spot — is caused by the fungus Coryneum carpophilum. In Colorado it affects mainly peaches and apricots, and to a lesser degree sweet cherries. Severe foliar shot holing may weaken a tree, while the most apparent damage is infection of the fruit.

Authors: 
H. Larsen
Publisher: 
Colorado State University Extension
Year: 
2009

White Mold of Dry Beans

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One of the most important diseases affecting dry beans in western Nebraska and Colorado is white mold caused by the fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. In recent years, losses from this disease have averaged as high as 20 percent, with a few individual field losses exceeding 65 percent.

Authors: 
H.F. Schwartz
Authors: 
J.R. Steadman
Authors: 
D.S. Wysong
Authors: 
E.D. Kerr
Publisher: 
Colorado State University Extension
Year: 
2004

Rust of Dry Beans

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Rust is an important disease that affects dry beans in eastern Colorado, western Nebraska and surrounding regions. The disease is caused by the fungus Uromyces appendiculatus, which has caused periodic epidemics in this region during the last 50 years. Recent losses from the disease have exceeded 50 percent in some areas.

Authors: 
H.F. Schwartz
Authors: 
J.R. Steadman
Authors: 
D.T. Lindgren
Publisher: 
Colorado State University Extension
Year: 
2004

Root Rots of Dry Beans

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Authors: 
H. F. Schwartz
Publisher: 
Colorado State University Extension
Year: 
2004

Bacterial Diseases of Beans

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Authors: 
H.F. Schwartz
Publisher: 
Colorado State University Extension
Year: 
2004

Agricultural Respiratory Protective Equipment

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Many harmful air-borne contaminants exist on farms and ranches, e.g., pesticides, dusts, anhydrous ammonia, etc. Protection from air-borne contaminants can be achieved in several ways.

Authors: 
M. Legault
Authors: 
P.D. Ayers
Authors: 
S.K. McDonald
Publisher: 
Colorado State University Extension
Year: 
2007
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