Collard Greens

Vegetable Crop Handbook for Southeastern United States - 2012

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The purpose of this book is to provide the best and most up-to-date information available for commercial vegetable growers in the southeastern US: Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Texas, Tennessee, South Carolina and Virginia. These recommendations are suggested guidelines for production in the above states. Factors such as markets, weather, and location may warrant modifications and/or different practices or planting dates not specifically mentioned in this book.
Content:

Authors: 
Researchers from the followings institutions
Authors: 
Auburn University
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Clemson University
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Louisiana State University
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Mississippi State University
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North Carolina State University
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Oklahoma State University
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Texas A&M System
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University of Florida
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University of Georgia
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University of Kentucky
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University of Tennessee
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Virgina Tech
Publisher: 
Fruit & Vegetable Growers Associations from Alabama, Mississippi, North Carolina, and South Carolina
Year: 
2012

Precooling Fruits and Vegetables in Georgia

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Fruits and vegetables begin to deteriorate after they are harvested and separated from their growing environment. The rate of deterioration defines how long they will be acceptable for consumption. This is known as “shelf life.” To preserve the quality of fruits and vegetables and maximize profits for growers, it is critical to control the temperature of fresh produce and minimize the amount of time that products are exposed to detrimental temperatures.

Authors: 
Changying “Charlie” Li
Publisher: 
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension
Year: 
2011

Insect Management for Leafy Vegetables

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Damage to leafy vegetables results from holes chewed in leaves by caterpillars and beetles, leaf mining by fly larvae and disease transmission and head contamination by piercing sucking insects. Major pests of these crops are beet and southern armyworms, cutworms, cabbage loopers, dipterous leafminers, aphids, cucumber beetles and wireworms. Less common pests of leafy vegetables include seedcorn maggot, seedcorn beetle and corn earworm.

Authors: 
G. S. Nuessly
Authors: 
S. E. Webb
Publisher: 
University of Florida IFAS Extension
Year: 
2010

Insect Management for Crucifers (Cole Crops) (Broccoli, Cabbage, Cauliflower, Collards, Kale, Mustard, Radishes, Turnips)

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Authors: 
S. E. Webb
Publisher: 
University of Florida IFAS Extension
Year: 
2010

Alabama Pest Management Handbook

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The Alabama Pest Management Handbook—Volume II contains recommendations for houses, buildings, and grounds; commercial trees and ornamental crops; commercial horticultural crops; and homeowner lawns and ornamental and garden crops.

Authors: 
Alabama Cooperative Extension Team
Publisher: 
Alabama Cooperative Extension System
Year: 
2013

Scheduling Vegetable Plantings for Continuous Harvest

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Market gardeners try to schedule their planting so they can offer customers a continuous supply of fresh flowers, herbs, and vegetables throughout the growing season. This publication helps growers plan planting times and succession planting, by providing soil temperature germination ranges and other information of assistance to market gardeners.

Authors: 
Janet Bachmann
Publisher: 
ATTRA Publication
Year: 
2008

Transplant Production

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Vegetable transplants are affected by many factors, but the most important are water, temperature, fertilization, sunlight, cell size, and length of stay in the house. These factors must be managed to produce a product that is acceptable to the customer.

Authors: 
B.M. Santos
Publisher: 
University of Florida IFAS Extension
Year: 
2010

Greens: Mustard, Turnip, Collard and Kale

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Greens are grown for the tops only. The proper size at harvest varies with the crop and growing conditions. Kale is allowed to grow to take two cuttings off one seeding. Some growers continue to strip kale leaves as the plants grow, thereby extending the harvest season for some time. Greens are usually on a constant field rotation to avoid club-root infestation in the soil. Field seeding begins in early April and ends in early August.

Authors: 
Robert J. Precheur
Authors: 
Mark Bennett
Authors: 
Brad Bergefurd
Authors: 
Luis Cañas
Authors: 
David Francis
Authors: 
Gary Gao
Authors: 
Casey Hoy
Authors: 
Jim Jasinski
Authors: 
Mark Koenig
Authors: 
Matt Kleinhenz
Authors: 
Hal Kneen
Publisher: 
Ohio State University Extension
Year: 
2010

Postharvest - Greens for Cooking

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This article presents postharvest information and storage requirements for kale, collards, rape, spinach, mustard, and turnip. It also includes information on quality characteristics, maturity indices, grading, packaging, pre-cooling, retail display, chilling sensitivity, ethylene production and sensitivity, respiration rates, physiological disorders, postharvest pathology, quarantine issues, and suitability as fresh-cut product.

Authors: 
James W. Rushing
Publisher: 
USDA Agriculture Handbook
Year: 
2004
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