Mustard

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Allelopathic Belongings of Dried Walnut Leaf on Seed Germination and Seedling Growth of Mustard

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Phytotoxic effects of aqueous extracts of walnut leaf were studied on germinating seeds and early seedling growth of mustard (Brassica campestris cv. Karanti) under western Himalayan agri-silvi system. Five treatments comprised of distilled water (control), 40, 60, 80 and 100% concentration of leaf extracts were treated. The effect of aqueous extracts was found inhibitive with concentration dependent manner on seed germination and subsequent seedling growth. The variety exhibited extent of phytotoxicity at 100% extracts application in comparison to untreated control.

Authors: 
Sandhya Bahuguna
Authors: 
Abhishek Bahuguna
Authors: 
Narendra Singh
Publisher: 
American Journal of Food Technology
Year: 
2,014

North Carolina Agricultural Chemicals Manual: Fertilizer Use

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Contents:

Authors: 
C. R. Crozier
Authors: 
D. L. Osmond
Authors: 
M. Castillo
Authors: 
E. J. Dunphy
Authors: 
K. Edmisten
Authors: 
L. Fisher
Authors: 
R. W. Heiniger
Authors: 
D. L. Jordan
Authors: 
J. M. Luginbuhl
Authors: 
D. H. Hardy
Authors: 
M. L. Parker,
Authors: 
J. Pattison
Authors: 
B. Cline
Authors: 
G. E. Fernandez
Authors: 
K. Hicks
Authors: 
Charles Peacock
Authors: 
Grady Miller
Authors: 
Matt Martin
Authors: 
B. Fair
Authors: 
A. V. LeBude
Authors: 
J. R. Schultheis
Authors: 
J. M. Davis
Publisher: 
North Carolina Cooperative Extension Service
Year: 
2,016

Understanding Spices for Processing

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Authors: 
E. V. Divakara Sastry
Publisher: 
Ethiopian Journal of Applied Sciences and Technology
Year: 
2,013

Vegetable Production Guide for Commercial Growers

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This publication is an extensive vegetable production guide that addresses topics such as marketing aspects for production decisions, general production considerations, insect management, weed management, and disease management. You will find specific information for the following crops:

Authors: 
Tim Coolong
Authors: 
Ric Bessin
Authors: 
Shawn Wright
Authors: 
John Strang
Authors: 
Kenny Seebold
Publisher: 
University of Kentucky
Year: 
2,013

Turnip Mosaic Virus

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Turnip Mosaic Virus (TuMV) infects most cruciferous plants, but is most damaging in Chinese cabbage, turnip, mustard, and radish. The most common symptom in these crops is a distinct mosaic of light and dark green colors in the leaves. Depending upon the virus strain and the crop species, necrotic streaks, flecks, or ringspots may also occur. Necrotic spots and ringspots are the primary symptom in common cabbage, but the severity of symptoms is cultivar dependent.

Authors: 
Lowell L Black
Publisher: 
AVRDC – The World Vegetable Center
Year: 
2,001

Resource Guide for Organic Insect and Disease Management

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Organic farmers rely primarily on preventive, cultural, and integrated methods of pest and disease management. Additionally, there are a number of materials that can complement and support organic management. This guide was developed to provide a useful and scientifically accurate reference for organic farmers and agricultural professionals who are searching for information on best practices, available materials, and perhaps most importantly, the efficacy of materials that are allowed for use in organic systems.

Authors: 
Brian Caldwell
Authors: 
Eric Sideman
Authors: 
Abby Seaman
Authors: 
Anthony Shelton
Authors: 
Christine Smart
Publisher: 
Cornell University
Year: 
2,013

Midwest Vegetable Production Guide for Commercial Growers

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Contents:

Authors: 
Dan Egel
Authors: 
Ricky Foster
Authors: 
Elizabeth Maynard
Authors: 
Rick Weinzierl
Authors: 
Mohammad Babadoost
Authors: 
Patrick O’Malley
Authors: 
Ajay Nair
Authors: 
Raymond Cloyd
Authors: 
Cary Rivard
Authors: 
Megan Kennelly
Authors: 
Bill Hutchison
Authors: 
Sanjun Gu
Authors: 
Robert J. Precheur
Authors: 
Celeste Welty
Authors: 
Douglas Doohan
Authors: 
Sally Miller
Publisher: 
University of Illinois Extension, Purdue Extension, Iowa State University Extension, Kansas State University Research, University of Minnesota Extension, University of Missouri Extension, and Ohio State University Extension
Year: 
2,013

Saving Your Own Vegetable Seeds - a guide for farmers

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Vegetable seeds can be saved to sow new crops in the future, but not all seeds are suitable for saving. Varieties suitable for seed saving include local varieties that have been grown in one region for a very long time, self-pollinating crops (for example, beans and peas), and open-pollinated varieties of some cross-pollinating crops (for example, pepper, cucumber and carrot).

Authors: 
Sutevee Sukprakarn
Authors: 
Sunanta Juntakool
Authors: 
Rukui Huang
Authors: 
Tom Kalb
Publisher: 
AVRDC – The World Vegetable Center
Year: 
2,005
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