Tomato

Precooling Fruits and Vegetables in Georgia

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Fruits and vegetables begin to deteriorate after they are harvested and separated from their growing environment. The rate of deterioration defines how long they will be acceptable for consumption. This is known as “shelf life.” To preserve the quality of fruits and vegetables and maximize profits for growers, it is critical to control the temperature of fresh produce and minimize the amount of time that products are exposed to detrimental temperatures.

Authors: 
Changying “Charlie” Li
Publisher: 
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension
Year: 
2011

El Uso del Ácido Salicílico y Fosfonatos (Fosfitos) para Activar el Sistema de Resistencia de la Planta (SAR)

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Authors: 
USAID
Publisher: 
USAID
Year: 
2006

Grafting Tomatoes for Production in the Hot-Wet Season

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Tomatoes are difficult to grow during the hot-wet season. Flooding, waterlogged soils, diseases, and high temperatures can significantly reduce yields.

Grafting tomato scions onto selected rootstocks of eggplant and tomato can minimize problems caused by flooding and soil-borne diseases. Sometimes the use of grafted tomato plants can be the difference between harvesting a good crop and harvesting no crop at all.

Authors: 
L.L. Black
Authors: 
D.L. Wu
Authors: 
J.F. Wang
Authors: 
T. Kalb
Authors: 
D. Abbass
Authors: 
J.H. Chen
Publisher: 
Asian Vegetable Research and Development Center
Year: 
2003

Effect of Cooling Delays on Fruit and Vegetable Quality

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Authors: 
Jim Thompson
Authors: 
Marita Cantwell
Authors: 
Mary Lu Arpaia
Authors: 
Adel Kader
Authors: 
Carlos Crisosto
Authors: 
Joe Smilanick
Publisher: 
Perishables Handling Quarterly
Year: 
2001

Pruning and Staking Tomatoes

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Pruning and staking indeterminate tomato plants can result in earlier fruit maturity and larger fruit. This guide illustrates pruning and staking methods practiced in Taiwan and other countries.

Pruning (removal of side shoots and lower shoots) diverts nutrients to flower clusters and fruits on the main stem, and allows more efficient air circulation.

Authors: 
J.T. Chen
Authors: 
G. Lal
Publisher: 
Asian Vegetable Research and Development Center
Year: 
1999

Vegetables USA September 2011

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Authors: 
USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service
Publisher: 
USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service
Year: 
2011

Keys to Successful Tomato and Cucumber Production in Perlite Media

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Authors: 
George J. Hochmuth
Authors: 
Robert C. Hochmuth
Publisher: 
University of Florida IFAS Extension
Year: 
2009

Suggested Cultural Practices for Tomato

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Tomatoes grow best in temperatures 20–27°C. Fruit setting is poor when average temperatures exceed 30°C or fall below 10°C. Tomatoes prefer welldrained soil because they are sensitive to waterlogging. Optimum soil pH is 6.0–7.0.

Authors: 
P. Hanson
Authors: 
J.T. Chen
Authors: 
C.G. Kuo
Authors: 
R. Morris
Authors: 
R.T. Opeña
Publisher: 
Asian Vegetable Research and Development Center
Year: 
2000

Vegetables and Melons Outlook - August 2011

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The farm value of all mushroom (Agaricus and others) sales during the 2010/11 crop year (July-June) reached a new high of $1 billion, up 8 percent from a year earlier. Partly reflecting modest gains in the economy, mushroom sales volume rose 9 percent to 862 million pounds, the second highest level on record. In line with higher output, per capita disappearance (use) of all mushrooms grew 8 percent to 3.82 pounds in 2010/11.

Authors: 
Gary Lucier
Authors: 
Lewrene Glaser
Publisher: 
USDA Economic Research Service
Year: 
2011

Foliar Diseases of Tomatoes

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Foliar diseases are major obstacles to successful commercial and home tomato production in Alabama. Both commercial producers and home gardeners must control this group of diseases to produce good yields and top quality fruit.

Authors: 
Edward J. Sikora
Authors: 
William Gazaway
Authors: 
Jacqueline Mullen
Publisher: 
Alabama Cooperative Extension System
Year: 
1998
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