Jojoba

Propagation of Jojoba Shrub by Grafting

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Autores: 
Magda M. Khattab
Autores: 
Ayman A. Hegazi
Autores: 
Mohamed E. Elsayed
Autores: 
Abd Thi Al Jalal Z. Hassan
Editora: 
Journal of Horticultural Science & Ornamental Plants
Año: 
2013

Influence of Reduced Phenolics and Simmondsins Contents on Protein Quality of Defatted Jojoba Meal

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Autores: 
Suzanne M. Wagdy
Autores: 
F.S. Taha
Autores: 
Salma S. Omar
Editora: 
American Journal of Food Technology
Año: 
2016

Use of Carbonized Seed Hulls as Alternative to Bleaching Clay During Miscella Bleaching of Oils

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Autores: 
Mona El-Hamidi
Autores: 
F.S. Taha
Autores: 
Safinaz M. El-Shami
Autores: 
Minar M.M. Hassanein
Editora: 
American Journal of Food Technology
Año: 
2016

The US market for natural ingredients used in dietary supplements and cosmetics, with highlights on selected Andean products

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This Market Brief profiles the US market for natural ingredients that are used in the cosmetic and/or dietary supplement industries, respectively, with highlights on selected Andean natural ingredients that have potential for capturing a larger share of the US market.

Autores: 
Josef A. Brinckmann
Editora: 
International Trade Centre
Año: 
2003

Jojoba

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Jojoba (Simmodsia chinensis (Link) Schneider) is a perennial woody shrub native to the semiarid regions of southern Arizona, southern California and northwestern Mexico. Jojoba (pronounced ho-HO-ba) is being cultivated to provide a renewable source of a unique high-quality oil.

Autores: 
D.J. Undersander
Autores: 
E.A. Oelke
Autores: 
A.R. Kaminski
Autores: 
J.D. Doll
Autores: 
D.H. Putnam
Autores: 
S.M. Combs
Autores: 
C.V. Hanson
Editora: 
Purdue University
Año: 
1990
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