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Precooling Fruits and Vegetables in Georgia

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Fruits and vegetables begin to deteriorate after they are harvested and separated from their growing environment. The rate of deterioration defines how long they will be acceptable for consumption. This is known as “shelf life.” To preserve the quality of fruits and vegetables and maximize profits for growers, it is critical to control the temperature of fresh produce and minimize the amount of time that products are exposed to detrimental temperatures.

Autores: 
Changying “Charlie” Li
Editora: 
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension
Año: 
2011

Sclerotinia Rot of Cabbage

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Autores: 
Helene R. Dillard
Editora: 
Cornell Cooperative Extension
Año: 
1987

Insect Management for Leafy Vegetables

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Damage to leafy vegetables results from holes chewed in leaves by caterpillars and beetles, leaf mining by fly larvae and disease transmission and head contamination by piercing sucking insects. Major pests of these crops are beet and southern armyworms, cutworms, cabbage loopers, dipterous leafminers, aphids, cucumber beetles and wireworms. Less common pests of leafy vegetables include seedcorn maggot, seedcorn beetle and corn earworm.

Autores: 
G. S. Nuessly
Autores: 
S. E. Webb
Editora: 
University of Florida IFAS Extension
Año: 
2010

Insect Management for Crucifers (Cole Crops) (Broccoli, Cabbage, Cauliflower, Collards, Kale, Mustard, Radishes, Turnips)

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Autores: 
S. E. Webb
Editora: 
University of Florida IFAS Extension
Año: 
2010

Vegetables and Melons Outlook - August 2011

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The farm value of all mushroom (Agaricus and others) sales during the 2010/11 crop year (July-June) reached a new high of $1 billion, up 8 percent from a year earlier. Partly reflecting modest gains in the economy, mushroom sales volume rose 9 percent to 862 million pounds, the second highest level on record. In line with higher output, per capita disappearance (use) of all mushrooms grew 8 percent to 3.82 pounds in 2010/11.

Autores: 
Gary Lucier
Autores: 
Lewrene Glaser
Editora: 
USDA Economic Research Service
Año: 
2011

Diamondback Moth Plutella xylostella (Linnaeus)

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The diamondback moth, introduced into the United States from Europe, is a worldwide pest of cruciferous crops. The larvae attack a wide range of cole crops including: cabbage, cauliflower, rape, kale, turnip, and brussels sprouts. In the Northeast, the diamondback moth is a sporadic pest, with four to six generations a year depending on locality.

Autores: 
J.T. Andaloro
Autores: 
P.B. Baker
Editora: 
Cornell Cooperative Extension Publication
Año: 
1983

Alabama Pest Management Handbook

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The Alabama Pest Management Handbook—Volume II contains recommendations for houses, buildings, and grounds; commercial trees and ornamental crops; commercial horticultural crops; and homeowner lawns and ornamental and garden crops.

Autores: 
Alabama Cooperative Extension Team
Editora: 
Alabama Cooperative Extension System
Año: 
2013

Scheduling Vegetable Plantings for Continuous Harvest

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Market gardeners try to schedule their planting so they can offer customers a continuous supply of fresh flowers, herbs, and vegetables throughout the growing season. This publication helps growers plan planting times and succession planting, by providing soil temperature germination ranges and other information of assistance to market gardeners.

Autores: 
Janet Bachmann
Editora: 
ATTRA Publication
Año: 
2008

Insecto Plaga de Hortalizas: Falconia intermedia

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El control de la plaga debe ser integrado; se recomiendan extractos de apazote con madero negro, otra opción es clavo de olor, hongos entomopatógenos tales como: Beauveria bassiana, Verticilium lecani o Trichoderma y uso de MM (Microorganismos de Montaña) con el fin de fortalecer las plantas.

Autores: 
Donald Villalobos Espinoza
Autores: 
Olger Benavides Rivera
Editora: 
Ministerio de Agricultura y Ganadería. San José, Costa Rica
Año: 
2011

Virus Diseases of Crucifers

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Many vegetables in the family Cruciferia are grown in New York, including cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, Chinese cabbage, mustard greens, turnip and radish. Although at least six viruses are known to infect cruciferous plants, the two most important viruses are turnip mosaic virus and cauliflower mosaic virus.

Autores: 
T. A. Zitter
Editora: 
Cornell University Cooperative Extension
Año: 
1984
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