Plant Catalog

Plant Catalog Index

Plant Catalog

Caracterización de cultivares de zapote (Pouteria sapota)

 
La caracterización del germoplasma representa una actividad importante para las colecciones de frutales que se conservan ex situ. La conservación del germoplasma no debe limitarse a su mantenimiento en campo, sino, que debe utilizarse con fines de investigación, enseñanza y promoción. Con la caracterización se extrae una serie de características cuantitativas y cualitativas, que permiten la selección de materiales y posterior utilización en programas de investigación o de otra naturaleza. El Centro Nacional de Tecnología Agropecuaria y Forestal (CENTA), cuenta con colecciones de frutales tropicales entre ellos el zapote; contándose con los siguientes cultivares: ‘Magaña’, ‘Rivera’ y ‘Valiente’. Estos cultivares fueron colectados en los departamentos de Ahuachapan y San Salvador; estableciéndose, en la estación experimental de San Andrés, departamento de La Libertad Con la caracterización se ha obtenido información sobre caracteres cualitativos y cuantitativos de fruto, semilla y de hoja. La caracterización bromatológica determinó el contenido nutricional de la pulpa, y la organoléptica permite la utilización de la fruta en la agroindustria.

CENTA
CENTA, El Salvador
Plant Catalog
Almond varieties

 
There are approximately 30 almond varieties produced in California orchards. Ten varieties represent over 70% of production. Varieties are grouped into broad classifications for marketing purposes based on distinguishing characteristics such as size, shape, and “blanchability.” The majority of almond production in California falls into the following three major classifications: Nonpareil, California, and Mission. Some varieties may fall under more than one classification because they have characteristics of one type (such as Mission) but are also blanchable (a characteristic of the California classification). All California Almonds are developed using traditional methods; genetically modified almond varieties are not planted or available in California.

Almond Board of California
Almond Board of California
Plant Catalog
Black walnut

Black walnut (Juglans nigra) is also known as American walnut. The tree is one of the most sought after of the native hardwoods. The tree grows in small natural groves. They are frequently found in mixed forests. They thrive well on moist alluvial soils. The tree has been heavily logged for its fine straight-grained wood that was used to make furniture and gunstocks. With the decreasing resource, the wood is used primarely for veneer. The nuts from black walnuts have been for food and medicine for a long time. The bark of the tree and shell of the nuts are also used for many purposes.

Tom Hammett
Virginia Tech
2,001
Plant Catalog
Jaboticaba (Myrciaria cauliflora)


The jaboticaba is native to the coastal forests and hilly regions of southern Brazil. It is also present in adjacent countries of Bolivia, Paraguay, Uruguay, and northern Argentina. Under native conditions, jaboticaba is frequently inundated for several weeks without serious damage, so it is considered watertolerant. The tree is well adapted for growth in South Florida and produces profusely and repeatedly at maturity. Despite its tremendous potential as a dooryard crop, it is rarely seen in Florida gardens.

Stephen H. Brown
Bronwyn Mason
University of Florida IFAS Extension
2,011
Plant Catalog
Spinach, Malabar - Basella rubra L.

Malabar spinach is also known as Ceylon spinach, climbing spinach, gui, acelga trepadora, bretana, libato, vine spinach, and Malabar nightshade. The red leaf form belongs to the rubra species, while the green form is classified in the alba species.

Malabar is not a true spinach, but its leaves, which form on a vine, resemble spinach and are used in the same way. It comes from India, and is distributed widely in the tropics, particularly in moist lowlands. In Florida, it is rare, even in home gardens.

James M. Stephens
University of Florida IFAS Extension
2,009
Plant Catalog
Amaranth (Amaranthus spp.)

 
Common Names: Amaranth, Chinese spinach, spiny pigweed, Joseph's-coat (En); amarante, épinard malabar, épinard piquant (Fr); amarantos, moco de pavo, blero (Sp); 莧菜 (Cn)
Related Species: A. tricolor, A. dubius, A. blitum, A. gangeticus, A. spinosus, A. viridis
Plant Distribution: All tropical and subtropical regions
Botanical Features: Annual herb up to 130 cm tall; stems erect, branched, angular, hairless to sparsely hairy, soft, juicy; leaves alternate, elliptic or ovate, 5-10 cm, soft-textured, golden yellow to dark green, some with red markings; inflorescence axillary, cluster up to 2.5 cm wide and 20 cm long; flowers sessile, minute and inconspicuous, unisexual, male and female intermixed; fruit one-seeded utricles; seeds 0.5-1.5 mm diameter, shining black or brown, faintly netted; epigeal germination.

L.J. Lin
Y.Y. Hsiao
C.G. Kuo
Discovering indigenous treasures. AVRDC
2,009
Plant Catalog
Baobab - Adansonia digitata

 
Common Names: Baobab, monkey-bread tree, dead-rat tree, cream-of-tartar tree (En); calebassier du Sénégal, arbre de mille ans, pain de singe (Fr); baobab, árbol botella (Sp); 猢猻木 (Cn)
Plant Distribution: Tropical Africa, Indian Ocean islands, Arabian Peninsula
Botanical Features: Deciduous tree to 20-25 m; trunk stout to 10 m in diameter, branches short, leafy at the ends; leaves palmately compound; petiole up to 16 cm long; leaflets 5-7, oblong, to 15 cm, acuminate, entire, sessile or shortly stalked; flowers on long peduncles to 20 cm in diameter, white; fruit woody, indehiscent capsules, globular to egg-shaped or cylindrical, 10-30 cm, many-seeded; seeds 1.5 x 1.0 cm, smooth, dark brown to black, with thick seed coat; hypogeal germination.

L.J. Lin
Y.Y. Hsiao
C.G. Kuo
AVRDC Discovering indigenous treasures
2,009
Plant Catalog
Cape Gooseberry (Physalis peruviana L.)

 

The genus Physalis, of the family Solanaceae, includes annual and perennial herbs bearing globular fruits, each enclosed in a bladderlike husk which becomes papery on maturity. Of the more than 70 species, only a very few are of economic value. One is the strawberry tomato, husk tomato or ground cherry, P. Pruinosa L., grown for its small yellow fruits used for sauce, pies and preserves in mild-temperate climates. Though more popular with former generations than at present, it is still offered by seedsmen. Various species of Physalis have been subject to much confusion in literature and in the trade. A species which bears a superior fruit and has become widely known is the cape gooseberry, P. Peruviana L. (P. edulis Sims). It has many colloquial names in Latin America: capuli, aguaymanto, tomate sylvestre, or uchuba, in Peru; capuli or motojobobo embolsado in Bolivia; uvilla in Ecuador; uvilla, uchuva, vejigón or guchavo in Colombia; topotopo, or chuchuva in Venezuela; capuli, amor en bolsa, or bolsa de amor, in Chile; cereza del Peru in Mexico. It is called cape gooseberry, golden berry, pompelmoes or apelliefie in South Africa; alkekengi or coqueret in Gabon; lobolobohan in the Philippines; teparee, tiparee, makowi, etc., in India; cape gooseberry or poha in Hawaii.

Julia F. Morton
Fruits of warm climates
1,987
Plant Catalog
Okra (Abelmoschus esculentus)

 

Annual herb, hairless to bristly-hairy; stem erect up to 1.5 m or more, stout, branched, woody toward the base; leaves alternate, long-petioled, 6-35 cm wide, palmately fivelobed to compound or scarcely lobed; inflorescence of solitary, large, stout-pediceled flowers in the upper leaf axils, involucral bracts 8-12, linear, up to 2.5 cm long, falling early; flowers up to 7.5 cm wide, radially symmetric, broadly bell- or funnel-shaped; corollas white to yellow, purple or red at the base; capsules many-seeded, 5-angled, 6- 25 cm long, cylindric or finger-shaped, beaked, bristly then nearly hairless, green to purple when young, brownish when mature; seeds globular, 3-6 mm across, blackish; epigeal germination.

From: Discovering indigenous treasures: Promising indigenous vegetables from around the world

L.J. Lin
Y.Y. Hsiao
C.G. Kuo
AVRDC – The World Vegetable Center
2,009
Plant Catalog
Caracterización morfométrica de frutos y semillas de nanche (Byrsonima crassifolia (L.) H.B.K.)

El objetivo del trabajo fue caracterizar la morfología de frutos y semillas en 23 colectas de nanche (Byrsonima crassifolia (L.) H.B.K.), procedentes del estado de Tabasco, México. Para hacer la descripción se utilizaron 22 caracteres que se digitalizaron y en los cuales se hizo la medición, por medio de un analizador de imágenes. Los datos obtenidos se analizaron utilizando los programas SAS y NTSYS. Tres componentes principales explicaron 84.16 % de la variabilidad total. En el dendrograma, con una distancia euclidiana de 5.58, se definieron cinco grupos. El grupo I contiene frutos con mayores grados Brix y porcentaje de pulpa; en el grupo III se tienen frutos con los mayores valores en área, longitud del eje mayor, longitud del eje menor, diámetro feret, peso, grosor de pulpa, peso de pulpa, y las variables relacionadas con la semilla, área, perímetro, longitud del eje mayor, longitud del eje menor, diámetro feret, peso en fresco, peso en seco y el valor HUE. El grupo IV presenta el mayor valor de luminosidad (L) y croma (C). El grupo V presenta el mayor valor del volumen de 25 frutos. Estos resultados muestran la diversidad de nanche existente en Tabasco, México, por lo que la información puede ser útil para la selección de germoplasma.

E. Martínez-Moreno
T. Corona-Torres
E. Avitia-García
A. M. Castillo-González
T. Terrazas-Salgado
M. T. Colinas-León
Revista Chapingo Serie Horticultura
2,006
Plant Catalog