Australia

warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home/hortcals/public_html/drupal/sites/all/modules/i18n/i18ntaxonomy/i18ntaxonomy.pages.inc on line 34.

Quinoa: Opportunities and Challenges in Australia

0
No votes yet
Your rating: None

 

Table of Contents:

Authors: 
Lucy Kealy
Publisher: 
Rural Industries Research and Development Corporation
Year: 
2,017

Value-Adding Options for Tropical Fruit using Jackfruit as a Case Study

4
Average: 4 (1 vote)
Your rating: None

 

Authors: 
Adrian Best
Publisher: 
Rural Industries Research and Development Corporation
Year: 
2,015

The Emerging Australian Date Palm Industry: Date Fruit Nutritional and Bioactive Compounds and Valuable Processing By-Products

0
No votes yet
Your rating: None

Abstract

 
Authors: 
Sameera Sirisena
Authors: 
Ken Ng
Authors: 
Said Ajlouni
Publisher: 
Comprehensive Reviews in Food Science and Food Safety
Year: 
2,015

Australian subtropical coffee grower’s manual

0
No votes yet
Your rating: None

Authors: 
David Peasley
Authors: 
David Ashton
Authors: 
Jos Webber
Authors: 
Ron Woods
Publisher: 
Rural Industries Research and Development Corporation
Year: 
2,014

Anthracnose in olives: symptoms, disease cycle and management

5
Average: 5 (2 votes)
Your rating: None

 

Authors: 
V. Sergeeva
Publisher: 
Proceedings of 4th International Conference Olivebioteq
Year: 
2,012

Management of Black Scale and Apple Weevil in Olives

0
No votes yet
Your rating: None


What the report is about
This report provides olive growers with monitoring, and organic and conventional control methods for black scale and apple weevil. The information generated by this project also provides new methods to improve control of apple weevil.
Who is the report targeted at?

Authors: 
Sonya Broughton
Authors: 
Stewart Learmonth
Publisher: 
RIRDC Australia
Year: 
2,012

English Spinach

4
Average: 4 (1 vote)
Your rating: None

 
Spinach is a generic term for certain vegetables which are grown, cooked and consumed for the high content of minerals and vitamins in their leaves. The term spinach may refer to plants from five different families, including English or common spinach (Spinacia oleracea), silverbeet or Swiss chard (Beta vulgaris), French spinach or orach (Atriplex hortensis), New Zealand spinach (Tetragonia expansa), Chinese spinach (Amaranthus gangeticus), water spinach (Ipomoea aquatica) and Indianspinach (Basella rubra).

Authors: 
J.R. Burt
Publisher: 
Department of Agriculture - Western Australia
Year: 
2,006

Avocado Diseases

4.5
Average: 4.5 (2 votes)
Your rating: None

 
In New South Wales avocados are grown in the coastal areas north of Gosford with some plantings in the irrigation areas along the lower Murray River. The principal soils are basaltic clay loams on the coast and deep sands at Stuarts Point and on the Murray.
The main cultivar is Hass. It is grafted on seedling rootstocks derived from non-edible avocados of the Mexican or Guatemalan botanical races. Fuerte and Sharwil, once popular varieties, are now on the decline. Lamb Hass, a new variety, is being planted in some areas. Fruit are harvested from April to December.

Authors: 
R N. Allen
Authors: 
G.E. Stovold
Authors: 
J.F. Dirou
Publisher: 
NSW Agriculture
Year: 
2,004

Vegetable Growing Manual

4.5
Average: 4.5 (2 votes)
Your rating: None

 
 
A guide to vegetable growing in the semi-arid tropics of the Top End of the Northern Territory (Australia)
This vegetable growing manual is a consolidation of twenty years of research, development and general experiences of various NT Government officers in growing vegetables.

Authors: 
Kevin Blackburn
Authors: 
Mark Traynor
Authors: 
Greg Owens
Authors: 
Chris Wicks
Authors: 
Matt Darcey
Authors: 
Melinda Gosbee
Authors: 
Liz Easton
Authors: 
Graeme Patch
Authors: 
Stuart Smith
Authors: 
Colin Martin
Authors: 
Chelsea Moore
Publisher: 
Northern Territory Department of Resources, Australia
Year: 
2,012

A Guide to the Common Postharvest Diseases & Disorders of Navel Oranges and Mandarins Grown in Inland Australia

4.75
Average: 4.8 (4 votes)
Your rating: None

 
This guide should be used to identify disorders when fruit arrives at overseas markets and to provide useful feedback to the industry when a problem occurs. It is aimed to assist growers, packers, wholesalers and exporters that may be present at outturn. As such, the information provided focuses on the most common problems occurring on citrus sent to our major export markets. It does not show defects, such as wind blemish, that should be sorted out before packing.

Authors: 
Peter Taverner
Authors: 
Barry Tugwell
Authors: 
Brian Wild
Publisher: 
South Australian Research and Development Institute
Syndicate content