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North Carolina Production Guide for Smaller Orchard Plantings

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Contents:

  • Introduction
  • Site SelectionSoils
  • Cultivar Selection
  • Rootstocks
  • Orchard Design
  • When and How to Plant
  • Planting a Fruit Tree
  • Pest, Disease, and Weed Control
  • Pruning and Training for Tree Development
  • Harvesting
  • Post-Harvest Handling
  • Potential Markets
  • Resources
Authors: 
Nicholas T. Basinger
Authors: 
Joseph M. Owle
Authors: 
Abbey Piner
Authors: 
Michael L. Parker
Publisher: 
North Carolina Cooperative Extension Service
Year: 
2,016

Strip Tillage and Early-Season Broadleaf Weed Control in Seeded Onion (Allium cepa)

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Authors: 
Sarah Gegner-Kazmierczak
Authors: 
Harlene Hatterman-Valenti
Publisher: 
MDPI
Year: 
2,016

Susceptibility of Blackberry Flowers to Freezing Temperatures

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Authors: 
F. Takeda
Authors: 
DM. Glenn
Publisher: 
European Journal of Horticultural Science
Year: 
2,016

Food Safety Guidelines for Fresh Fruits and Vegetables

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Unsafe handling of fresh produce has resulted in a number of product recalls and food-borne illness outbreaks. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) advises consumers to be aware of safe handling and preparation practices for fresh fruits and vegetables. To reduce the risk of foodborne illness from fresh produce, you must follow the guidelines below. 

Authors: 
No author info available
Publisher: 
FDA
Year: 
2,007

Six Steps to Identifying Nutrient Deficiencies in Ornamental Plants

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Greenhouse growers in Michigan are busy wrapping up transplanting and shipping theirproduct. In the flurry of the season, growers may overlook nutritional disorders in their crops. Most growers have trouble identifying nutrient deficiencies because many of the nutrient deficiencies create similar symptoms. So, how can you tell what nutrient is d

Authors: 
Heidi Wollaeger
Publisher: 
Michigan State University Extension
Year: 
2,016

Performance of ‘Valencia’ Orange (Citrus sinensis [L.] Osbeck) on 17 Rootstocks in a Trial Severely Affected by Huanglongbing

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‘Valencia’ orange (Citrus sinensis [L.] Osbeck) was grown on 17 rootstocks through seven years of age and the first four harvest seasons in a central Florida field trial severely affected by huanglongbing (HLB) disease. All trees in the trial had HLB symptoms and were shown by PCR to be infected with Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (Las). Large differences were noted between rootstocks for many metrics examined, including yield, fruit quality, and tree size.

Authors: 
Kim D. Bowman
Authors: 
Greg McCollum
Authors: 
Ute Albrecht
Publisher: 
Scientia Horticulturae
Year: 
2,016

Willingness to Pay for Native Pollination of Blueberries: A Conjoint Analysis

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This study estimates blueberry consumer reaction to a potential honey bee Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD) management strategy; increased reliance upon native pollinators like the common Eastern Bumble bee (Bombus impatiens). A survey of 498 consumers was conducted using Amazon’s Mechanical Turk. Respondents were asked to rate on a scale of 1 to 5, four different blueberry “packages” each containing five attributes; price, pollination method (native bee, commercial honey bee), fresh or frozen, produced in or out of state and variety (wild, cultivated).

Authors: 
Thomas Stevens
Authors: 
Aaron K. Hoshide
Authors: 
Francis A. Drummond
Publisher: 
International Journal of Agricultural Marketing
Year: 
2,015

Fruit and Vegetable Co-Products as Functional Feed Ingredients in Farm Animal Nutrition for Improved Product Quality

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There are significant environmental, economic and social factors favoring the reutilization of fruit and vegetable processing co-products in farm animal nutrition. Current evidence shows that fruit and vegetable processing co-products can be effectively used in farm animal nutrition as functional feed ingredients for the production of food products of improved quality. These ingredients comply with consumer requests for the production of “clean,” “natural” and “eco/green” label food products.

Authors: 
Eleni Kasapidou
Authors: 
Evangelia Sossidou
Authors: 
Paraskevi Mitlianga
Publisher: 
Agriculture
Year: 
2,015

Blossom-End Rot and Calcium Nutrition of Pepper and Tomato

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Had the ancient Roman Empire not developed concrete and cement, the domed buildings, arched bridges and aqueducts we see today would not still give testimony to the Romans’ ingenuity or to the durability of a simple mineral: limestone. Although calcium (Ca) is well known as the main ingredient in limestone, it has also been used for building strong plant cell walls since long before man discovered its uses for lasting architecture.

Authors: 
Joshua L. Mayfield
Authors: 
William Terry Kelley
Publisher: 
University of Georgia Extension
Year: 
2,015

Southeastern Peach, Nectarine and Plum Pest Management and Culture Guide

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This guide covers multiple states and production areas. Pest problems vary across the Southeast. Pesticide rates are a guideline. Exceptions are noted for specific locations and pests, but this guide does not list every exception. Listed pesticides may not be registered for the uses recommended here in all states. 

Authors: 
Dan Horton
Authors: 
Phil Brannen
Authors: 
Bob Bellinger
Authors: 
David Lockwood
Authors: 
David Ritchie
Publisher: 
University of Gerogia Extension
Year: 
2,015
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