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High Tunnel Production: The Basics for Success and Three Case Studies on Profitability

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This publication summarizes a project that  took place in the Mid-Atlantic region, but high tunnels can be successfully used in a wide variety of climates and locations. They are especially profitable when located close to good markets, such as urban and periurban areas.   

Contents:

Authors: 
No author info available
Publisher: 
University of Maryland Extension
Year: 
2,013

High Tunnel Tomato Production Basics

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Tomatoes are king in high tunnels. Tom Ford, Penn State Extension, explains a few best management practices for successful high tunnel tomatoes. 
 

Contents:

  1. Trellising
  2. Pruning
  3. Cluster thinning
  4. Leaf removal
  5. Spacing
Authors: 
Tom Ford
Publisher: 
PennState Extension
Year: 
2,016

Determining How Long to Run Drip Irrigation Systems for Vegetables

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As a general rule, vegetable crops require 1 - 1.5 acre-inches of water per week. Penn State's Elsa Sanchez and Bill Lamont explain how to determine how long to run your drip irrigation system to meet this need.

Authors: 
Elsa Sánchez
Publisher: 
PennState Extension
Year: 
2,013

Preparing the Packinghouse for Peach Season

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The southeastern peach industry is known for the high quality of its fresh peaches. As a new peach season approaches, it is time to ready the packinghouse for output of the best peach product. Several areas in the packing facility should be considered. 

List of Contents:

  1. Hydrocooler
  2. Packing Line
  3. Cold Room
  4. Food Safety
Authors: 
Kathryn C. Taylor (authored)
Authors: 
Dario Chavez (reviewed)
Publisher: 
University of Georgia Extension
Year: 
2,015

UGA Weed Control Programs for Broccoli, Cabbage, and Cauliflower 2016

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When it comes to growing commercial broccoli, cabbage, and cauliflower, crop rotation, tillage, and a sound herbicide program are all often critical components for long-term success. This circular focuses on developing sound herbicide programs for cole crops while minimizing crop injury for the following production systems: 1) transplanting into mulch, 2) transplanting into bare ground, and 3) seeding into bare ground.

Authors: 
S. Culpepper
Authors: 
J. C. Smith
Publisher: 
University of Georgia, Department of Crop and Soil Sciences
Year: 
2,016

Controlling Black Knot in Michigan

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Black knot (Apiosporina morbosa), is a striking disease and a major disease of plum trees in Michigan. Black knot appears on the woody parts of the tree including twigs, limbs and sometimes the trunks. Black knot attacks plums, wild cherries and some ornamental cherries. Cultivated sweet and sour cherry trees are seldom attacked in Michigan. Black knot is found throughout Michigan in commercial and home orchards and in wild plum and cherry thickets.

Disease pictures and control methods are discussed.

Authors: 
Mark Longstroth
Publisher: 
Michigan State University Extension
Year: 
2,016

Which Vegetative Cuttings Should I Stick First?

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Greenhouse growers are now receiving unrooted cuttings from suppliers as the spring season begins to ramp up. What are the best management practices when receiving unrooted cuttings? How do growers evaluate their quality and determine which ones should be stuck first?

Authors: 
Heidi Wollaeger
Publisher: 
Michigan State University Extension
Year: 
2,016

Bacterial Leaf Scorch of Blueberry

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Relative to total sales, blueberries are the number one fruit commodity in the state of Georgia, surpassing even peaches. Recently, a new disease has been identified in the Georgia blueberry production region. This disease has been named “bacterial leaf scorch,” and it is caused by the bacterium Xylella fastidiosa.

Authors: 
Phillip M. Brannen
Authors: 
Gerard Krewer
Authors: 
Bob Boland
Authors: 
Dan Horton
Authors: 
CJ Chang
Publisher: 
University of Georgia Extension
Year: 
2,016

Increasing Fresh Edamame Bean Supply through Season Extension Techniques

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Soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.], a legume native to East Asia contains up to 40% protein and 20% oil. Edamame, a popular vegetable soybean in East Asia, especially China and Japan, harvested at reproductive stages six and seven (R6 or R7) is gaining popularity in the US. Increased awareness of its nutritional quality through promotional campaigns and changing population demographics in the US have led to recent raise in US market demand for edamame. To meet the increasing market demand, frozen edamame from China and Taiwan has been imported.

Authors: 
S Nolen
Authors: 
B Zhang
Authors: 
MK Kering
Publisher: 
Journal of Horticulture
Year: 
2,016

Tomato Production

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Tomatoes lend themselves well to small-scale and part-time farming operations. Many marketing opportunities are available for small-scale growers with multiple fruit colors (red, yellow, orange, and purple) and heirloom varieties, making it easier for growers to find niche markets.

Contents

Authors: 
Michael D. Orzolek
Authors: 
Steven M. Bogash
Authors: 
R. Matthew Harsh
Authors: 
Lynn F. Kime
Authors: 
Jayson K. Harper
Publisher: 
Pennsylvania State University
Year: 
2,006
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